Japan: The Sadness of Viewing Cherry Blossoms By a River

Japan: The Sadness of Viewing Cherry Blossoms by a River is a collection.  It includes nonfiction stories, fiction and poetry about Japan by a teacher who lived there. “Unobtainable Fishing Pole” relates how the author tried to convince a Living Treasure to make him one of his lacquered poles. They go fishing in the mountains of Wakayama. “Unquenchable Bucket” is how the American outdrank a Japanese man so famous he was called The Bucket from how much sake he could consume. “Unfamiliar Feelings of Barbers” concerns switching from one barber to another, a quite difficult feat in Japan.   A longer narrative relates how the writer became engaged to a Japanese woman without any idea he had done so.  For a start, he asks her given name.  This was a sign of great romantic interest to a Japanese female.  A journal of the author's year in Japan details the first year of the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program.  It includes many insights into the school system of Japan.  Fictional stories are about a sea captain, a private religion, and a climb up Mount Fuji to view the sunrise. The poems include many haiku.  Other poems are about a pilgrimage to an island, and a small temple bell. Many of these have been published in magazines.

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Japan: The Sadness of Viewing Cherry Blossoms by a River is a collection of nonfiction stories, fiction stories, and poems about Japan written by a teacher who lived there.  They describe modern Japan in great detail.  The nonfiction stories include one about a legendary fisherman in the mountains of Wakayama, and a famous drinker nicknamed The Bucket.  One narrative concerns switching barbers, quite a feat in Japan.  A longer narrative describes how the author became engaged to a Japanese woman without any idea he had done so.  For a start, he asks her given name, a sign of great romantic interest for a Japanese female.  The fiction involves a sea captain, a private religion, and a climb up Mount Fuji to view the sunrise.  A journal of the author’s year in Japan details the first year of the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program.  It provides many insights into the school system of Japan.  The poems include many haiku.  Others are about a pilgrimage to Shodoshima Island plus a small temple bell.   Many of the nonfiction stories, fiction stories and poems have been published.